WILLA CATHER

Wilella Silbert Cather (later “Willa”) was born to a farming family in 1873 in Back Creek Valley, Virginia. At age ten, she and her family moved to Webster County, Nebraska, to live at her grandfather's farm. This period formed the basis of her novels of frontier life O Pioneers! (1913) and My Antonia (1917), for which she is today most famous. After graduation from the University of Nebraska, she moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she became a newspaper editor for the Daily Leader, and later a high school teacher. Her first book of verse, April Twilights, was published in 1903. In 1906 she moved to New York City, where she became managing editor of McClure’s Magazine, and wrote her greatest novels, including The Professor’s House and Death Comes for the Archbishop. The Strategy of the Were-Wolf Dog was an early short story, first published in 1896. It is unusual for her writings, and Willa said that it was made up by her and her brothers Roscoe and Douglas to entertain the younger children at family gatherings. Willa Cather died in New York city in 1947. Her more typical frontier story, El Dorado, is adapted in Western Classics.

 

Christmas Classics:
Graphic Classics Volume 19

144 pages, color, $15

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Western Classics:
Graphic Classics Volume 20

144 pages, color, $15

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illustration ©2010 Evert Geradts
illustration ©2010 John Findley