illustrations ©2004 Richard Jenkins

 

CLARK ASHTON SMITH

A self-educated Californian, Clark Ashton Smith began writing fiction at age eleven, though most of his early writings were poetry. On the publication of his first poems in 1911, he was hailed as “the new Keats” by the San Francisco press, and became friends with Ambrose Bierce, Jack London and George Sterling. Despite the early success, and due to ill health, Smith chose to maintain a quiet, solitary life in rural California. Smith’s first horror story was published in The Overland Monthly in 1925, and during the 1930s he produced about a hundred fantasy stories for the pulp magazines, especially Weird Tales. His work drew the attention of H.P. Lovecraft, with whom Smith corresponded until Lovecraft’s death in 1937. After that date, Smith wrote little weird fiction, but concentrated on his poetry and artwork until his death in 1961. He is now considered one of the greatest fantasy poets of the 20th century.

 

Horror Classics:
Graphic Classics Volume 10

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Fantasy Classics:
Graphic Classics Volume 15

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